The Quest to Slow, Stop and Even Reverse Aging | Future You | NPR

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Published on 25 Sep 2019, 11:00
Scientists are better understanding why we age — and they're also better explaining the cellular changes that lead our bodies and brains to decline.

This research has led people like David Sinclair, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School, and Peter Attia, a longevity doctor and oncologist, to challenge the conventional wisdom that aging is inevitable.

Sinclair believes the humans of the future will live decades longer than we do now, thanks to biological and technological interventions that are already being discovered.

In short: Better understanding the mechanisms of aging has led to promising treatments to slow, stop and even reverse the symptoms of growing old. And turning back the clock this way isn't just about more lifespan; it's about extending healthy, vital years. Could pills that mimic the positive benefits of exercise, at least in mice, be effective for humans? And what does this portend for the future, if we will all live decades longer?

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